Rootin’-est Tootin’-est Cowboy in the Wild, Wild Cantina!

It’s no secret that Halloween is my favorite holiday. The candy, the decorations, the crisp fall weather… but mostly, the crafty possibility. I try to go all out on a costume every year, and 2015 did not disappoint.

Now that my son is getting older, he was able to have input into his costume choice for the first time.  He couldn’t decide between Woody from Toy Story and Star Wars, so I tried to give him both. Introducing… Sheriff Woody Solo! I tried to blend elements from both characters together into the ultimate space cowboy.

Woody Solo Costume

Woody Solo Costume

There are so many fun details in this costume, and I’ll try to touch on all of them. First was the bandana. Taking inspiration for a traditional red and white printed bandana, I set out to make a Star-Wars inspired version.

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Bandana

The final product turned out better than I could have hoped, especially considering my limited skills in AI. It went off to Spoonflower for printing.

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Bandana

He loved finding all of the characters once it arrived. As always, I was very pleased with the print quality.

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Bandana

A quick trim and hem and it was finished.

Woody Solo Costume

For the pants, I wanted to incorporate denim (Woody) and Corellian blood stripes (Han).

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Pants

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Pants

The pattern is free from Dana Made It – Kid Pants. I trimmed a bit off of each outer leg seam allowance to make room for a strip of stripes.

I used the flat front option. Scraps of topstitched vinyl were used for the belt and holster.

Woody Solo Costume

It’s tough, but if I had to pick my favorite part of this costume, it would probably be these Millenium Falcon buttons. I designed a very simple outline in Illustrator, and had them laser cut by Ponoko. Their service is so easy to use, even for a novice like myself. They make prototyping and pricing out options incredibly user friendly. I was able to get exactly what I wanted, within my budget, after a few small design tweaks. Their customer service is top notch, too! [No one is paying me to gush, I was just honestly impressed.]

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Millennium Falcon Buttons

After making the costume, I still have four buttons left over. Any suggestions?

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Millennium Falcon Buttons

On to the shirt. It quickly became clear that I wasn’t going to be able to find the white and red checked fabric that I had in mind. Again, this is a mix — Woody’s shirt is yellow with red checks, and Han’s is white/off white. I improvised with white cotton and a red permanent fabric marker.

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Shirt

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Shirt

The pattern for this shirt is another freebie, Western Style Toddler Shirt from Barmy Beetroot. My modifications were a velcro closure, faux buttons, and lengthening the sleeves from short to long. I also cut the cuffs, collar, and back yoke on the bias.

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Shirt

Woody Solo Costume

For the vest, I drew the structure from Han and the cow print from Woody. First, I sketched out the pocket placement from movie stills and figured out rough measurements.

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Vest

The vest pattern was the free (surprise!) Very Cozy Vest from Made by Marzipan.

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Vest

The cow print was freehanded with black Sharpie. Doesn’t get any easier than that! Woody Solo Costume

Another favorite detail — Woody’s pull string. A bit of cord from the fabric store coupled with a painted embroidery hoop innard.

Woody Solo Costume

Of course, I’ll take any excuse to use my Silhouette Cameo! The belt buckle, spurs, and badge were all designed with the Silhouette software. Each design was cut out of cereal box cardboard twice, then adhered together with my Xyron machine.

I then used the print & cut feature with Silhouette’s printable & adhesive gold foil. Layered al together, it made for sturdy pieces. I used a metallic gold marker around the raw edges to cover up the white from the cardboard.

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Accessories

Here’s a screencap of Woody’s belt buckle, to show where I got my inspiration for the Leia buckle.

Woody's Belt Buckle

Originally I had attempted to make boot covers, but I couldn’t get them to look how I had pictured them. Instead, we picked up a cheap pair of black rain boots, which I decorated with strips of topstitched vinyl and the gold foil spurs.

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Boots & Spurs

The finishing touch was the treat bag. I puzzled over it for a week or so, before settling on a mix of Woody’s pal and Han’s sidekick — Slink & Chewbacca. It took some time, but I came up with a design that I liked.

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Slink/Chewbacca Treat Bag

The finished image was printed on Sillhouette’s printable canvas. It was a fast way to finish up, but I wish the colors had been a bit more saturated. It fit the bill, though, and was stuffed full of goodies on Halloween night.

Woody Solo Costume in Progress: Slink/Chewbacca Treat Bag
Here are a few more pictures of our cowboy enjoying his costume.

Woody Solo Costume

Woody Solo Costume Woody Solo Costume

One final detail: the tauntaun hobby horse. Unfortunately it’s no longer available, as it was an exclusive from the 2012 Star Wars Celebration convention. I bought it back then to decorate our son’s nursery. It was great to incorporate it as part of his costume.

Woody Solo Costume

So another Halloween is on the books… and I’m already looking forward to next year!

Gimli Costume–Actual Dwarven Size!

It’s been a while. So let’s get right down to catching up on the past year or so!

First up is the crown jewel of my projects for 2014: my son’s Halloween costume. He’ll soon be of an age where he’ll want to make his own costume choices, so until that point, I plan on having some fun. Say hello to Gimli from Lord of the Rings.

Gimli Toddler Costume

It all started with a toddler-sized beard… When approaching a crazy project, I try to tackle the part most likely to fail — and the facial hair was the make or break for this costume. Fortunately I found a great tutorial — that I simply scaled down. I modified the finished beard to snap on to the helm with oversized snaps, as it was the part I figured he’d dislike the most. Spoiler alert — I was right.

Gimli Toddler Costume

Gimli Toddler Costume

From there, it was on to Gimli’s helm. I made changes to this free fleece knight helmet pattern, by adding chain mail-ish stitching on the back, as well as a medallion and cheek straps cut out of felt with my Silhouette Cameo. The designs were freehanded, and based loosely off of movie screenshots.

The tunic was based on Butterick 3244 — a simple fireman’s jacket. The sleeve pattern was chopped into a few pieces to get the look I was going for, and a faux chain mail underlayer was added.

Gimli Toddler Costume

The bandolier/belt was made from a few chopped up belts I found at the thrift store. I glued them together with industrial adhesive, then drilled holes and laced with decorative leather cord for extra reinforcement.

Gimli Toddler Costume

The treat bag is probably my favorite part. I traced a movie still of Gimli’s axe and cut it out of fusible web backed felt on my Silhouette. I created an offset around the original design and cut it out of another color of felt, then mounted the first on the second. It was reinforced with cardboard from a cereal box. I used a strip of felt to gusset the front and back together, and another thrift store belt for the handle.

Gimli Toddler Costume

Gimli Toddler Costume

Gimli Toddler Costume

He was a very good sport about the whole thing, and even wore the beard long enough for us to get a few good shots of the costume all together. For trick or treating and his school’s Halloween parade, he went sans facial hair — a good choice for everyone involved.

Gimli Toddler Costume

Gimli Toddler Costume

Gimli Toddler Costume

It was a great honor for this costume to be chosen as Craftster’s 2014 Costume Contest winner, as well as one of the Best of 2014 in the ‘Epic Challenge Winners of 2014’ category!

Gimli Toddler Costume

Don’t Feed the Plant!

These days I’m happy to be busy mom-ing, but every now and then I get the chance to indulge in something crafty… mostly during naps and after bedtime! I managed to find time to make E his first Halloween costume this year.

My husband was good enough to make it a group costume! They went as Seymour and Audrey II from Little Shop of Horrors.

Audrey II & Seymour

For the body of the costume, I used a pair of pajamas that fits as a rough pattern. Everything is made of fleece.

Audrey II & Seymour

For the hat, I used McCall’s #6812 to start, then added leaves, lips, teeth, gums, and an elastic chin strap to help keep it on his little noggin.

Audrey II & Seymour

Inner workings of the hat.

Audrey II & Seymour

The treat bag is made from felt and decorated it with a fabric marker.

Audrey II & Seymour

E was a great sport walking around to a few neighbors. Mostly he got a kick out of hanging onto fun sized candy bars.

Audrey II & Seymour

Between the thrift store sweater vest, dollar store glasses, and fleece for the baby’s costume, we only spent around $25.

Audrey II & Seymour Audrey II & Seymour

Boo!

Boo!

Skeleton Wreath

We’re getting into the swing of Halloween here at la casa Sticks. And nothing says “Welcome living, dead and undead” quite like a wreath o’ bones.

Full credit goes to Meg at Mega Spooky for her great tutorial. I couldn’t find the styrofoam skeleton pieces that she used, so I improvised. I bought two hollow plastic lawn skeletons from Michaels (with 40% off coupons, cha-ching). I can’t find a listing for them on Michael’s website, but it looks like Party City carries a similar item.

I actually planned ahead for once, and took some nice in-progress pictures for blogging. After quickly dismantling the joints with a Philips head, I collected my supplies… (Foreshadowing: note the glue)
Skeleton Wreath Progress

Started arranging…
Skeleton Wreath Progress

Arranged more…
Skeleton Wreath Progress

And right about there is where it all went to hell. The glue I purchased was a complete disaster. As was the second kind I bought, on a repeat trip to Home Depot. And the hot glue I tried after that didn’t work either. After my quick little crafty project turned into an afternoon of frustration, I was ready to give up completely. Cue my lovely husband, who suggested that I try using his scary looking high-temp industrial glue gun. And voila! That did the trick.

Skeleton Wreath

He deserves credit for the rose in Bonehead’s teeth, as well. It’s the perfect finishing touch. He looks appropriately spooky under the glow of our orange porch light!
Skeleton Wreath